LTAD

Speed characteristics of elite female soccer players: The FAIM Study

Speed characteristics of elite female soccer players: The FAIM Study

The physical profile of an athlete can distinguish between elite and non-elite status, independent of technical ability. Elite athletes are clearly identifiable in adolescence by higher levels of endurance and greater speed. A sizeable body of research continues to validate this hypothesis, however most of it is concentrated on male athletes. In professional soccer, little(…)

Strength training recommendations in front & back squat for elite youth soccer players

Strength training recommendations in front & back squat for elite youth soccer players

There is a growing body of evidence highlighting the positive effects of both plyometric and strength training for youth athletes. A little earlier this week, we posted that plyometric training in youth soccer players improves many physical performance indicators including, speed, strength & peak power. And a more recent study by Keiner et al. (2012) has demonstrated(…)

Plyometric training induces performance gains in pre-adolescent boys

Plyometric training induces performance gains in pre-adolescent boys

We received a great reaction to our post on resistance training in children, as the CSEP position paper affirmed the benefits of strength training for pre-adolescents. A recent paper published by Michalldis et al. (2012) adds another dimension to this paradigm by examining the effects of plyometric training on athletic performance in pre-adolescents (mean age 10.6 years). 45(…)

LTAD, “windows of opportunity” and athlete development

LTAD, “windows of opportunity” and athlete development

The LTAD model proposed by Balyi & Hamilton (2004) outlines a framework for the development of motor-skills and physical skills which run parallel to a chronological age profile of an athlete. It is an ambitious project that attempts to explain the physiological development of a young athlete all the way to adulthood. It has been(…)

Early specialization v multilateral development II

Early specialization v multilateral development II

The effect of early specialization on long-term athlete development is evidenced on physical and psychological levels. Harre et al. (1982) compared the major differences in athletes who specialized early v those who had a multilateral development: Early Specialisation v Multilateral Development 1. Quick performance improvements v Slower performance improvements 2. Best performances aged 15-16 years(…)

Resistance training in children and adolescents

Resistance training in children and adolescents

Should children and adolescents resistance train? The research says yes.  The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology have published a position stand on this topic and raise the following points in their abstract: – There is no minimum age for resistance training in children – Resistance training should include a proper warm-up, cool-down and appropriate exercises(…)