strength & conditioning

Does exercise prevent injury in football?

Does exercise prevent injury in football?

One of the main reasons exercise is heavily pushed for athletes and for the weekend gym goer, is the injury prevention effect of training. On top of the physiological effects, the psychological effects and even the social component- injury prevention is generally mentioned. Van Beijsterveldt, et al; 2013 performed a literature review on this very(…)

Resistance training and youth

Resistance training and youth

Faigenbaum and Myer, 2009 completed a literature review of youth involved in resistance training. As anyone in the field can observe, younger and younger children are weightlifting and more children are participating in sports. Resistance training should be used to prevent injury and enhance sport performance at that age- not the other way around. It(…)

Impact forces of land vs. water based plyometrics

Impact forces of land vs. water based plyometrics

Plyometrics, as we have discussed numerous times, are great for developing power and quickness. They are also serious work for joints and why most coaches recommend you have some serious weight training under your belt before you begin a serious plyomterics program. People have often hypothesized that one could develop similar levels of explosive force(…)

The Placebo Effect in Carb Loading

The Placebo Effect in Carb Loading

Many people who participate in long distance running, cycling or swimming supplement with carbohydrate beverages. The idea is that over long-periods time, the glucose necessary for fatty acid mobilization becomes used up and the athlete ‘hits the wall’ or ‘bonks out’. With replenishment, they can continue properly mobilizing fatty acids to fuel the activity and(…)

Fatigue biomarkers

Fatigue biomarkers

Fatigue is the enemy in training. It destroys skill work. It eliminates explosiveness. It cuts endurance. Fatigue is our enemy. This is why such an emphasis on training and recovery needs to occur in the preparation of any athlete. Until now, our way of measuring fatigue has been rate of perceived exertion- basically asking from(…)